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were not prepared for that. ongoing litigation. it was constantly, election administration was constantly embattled in a court. courts would intervene, state supreme court would make an emergency decision that secretary of state would decide whether to appeal the decision. it caused a lot of inconsistency and uneasiness going into the election not knowing how our provisional ballot would be counted, not knowing if it was a poll worker's responsibility or the voter's responsibility to fill out the provisional envelope, not knowing if we would have extended hours or weekend hours, preparing all that transcended into our budget, transcended into issues, do we have additional parking, do we get more temporaries, do we open in house voting stations, all contingent on the turnout. that would be at the board based on those decisions. in litigation, out comes by the secretary of state and other interested parties. early voting became a hot-button issue in ohio. that is one event. recommendations as an election administrator, the need to -- for consistent uniformity across the state
roosevelt was elected to president of the united states and became known among many things as the conservation president. it was his vision as president that jumpstarted the preservation movement in this country and gather here today we continue on with the effort to develop public policy that promotes the same ideals as tr did long ago. i have the privilege of being able to absorb what roosevelt experienced as i walk on the very same lands and see the same views he did so long ago. it was my time as governor of north dakota for a saturday to understand the public policy can be used to nudge along the same ideals and help conserve the foundations of our country. when i shared the western governors association, the group of 18 states goes from the country west, very involved in resource issues, we were shepherding the grand canyon visibility study. i was shocked when a regional epa administrator can then and was promoting the idea that north dakota should clean up the air better. i pointed out north dakota was the first state to meet the clean air standards, i was mining and
president, but the opposition is calling for a caretaker government and elections. we host a debate. a victory in the campaign against stop and frisk. >> going to the store in coming from the store, they're going to stop you. >> they stop about 90% of the people coming in. >> i don't mind the police being here, but not the harassment. >> new york police are not allowed to routinely stop pedestrians outside private residential buildings in the bronx. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least five people have been killed in u.s. drone strike in pakistan earlier today. the strike hit a home in north waziristan. it was at least the seventh u.s. drone strike in less than two weeks. the attack comes as the cia nominee john brennan continues to come under scrutiny for his role in the obama administration's drone warfare overseas. in his remarks at the time, brennan had said there was not a single collateral death in the previous year of drone attacks. his letter qualified his remarks by saying he had no i
is stephanie schriock. she is the president of emily's list. guest: this election was a mandate for women's leadership across the country. an historic number of women were sworn in it to congress last week. this election was also about women voters and women's issues, some of which i would prefer not having a debate about. we will see more and more women stepping up to run. host: 20 senators, 81 representatives in 2013. what issues to the brink when it comes to women's issues? guest: we have never had 20 women in the u.s. senate. it is a great benchmark to hit. i would like to see it at 50. we're adding diversity to the debate. we will end up with policies that are best for our committees. these women are bringing different perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of
. ♪ >>> energized by his re-election and that fiscal cliff deal, president obama is now taking ogg on two of washington's most powerful special interest groups. pro-gun and pro-israel lobbies. dominating chuck hagel point to a president unafraid of going head to head with two powerful lobbying groups that have long wheeleded strong influence in washington. i'm joined by national journal political correspondent beth rinehart who writes about the president's busting second term. >> thanks for having me. >> the president is relishing his approval numbers and the fact that he didn't have to run again. he actually talked about the second term on "meet the press." i want to play that. >> one of the nice things about never having another election again. i will never campaign again. is you know, i think you can rest assured that all i care about is making sure i leave behind an america that is stronger, more prosperous, more stable and secure than when i first came into office. >> the first thing, rahm emanuel when chief of staff, had this policy, you don't take on a fight that you don't have a r
he won the election, wendell willkie, fuji beach, was in the office and they remained friends. he said to the president why do you keep that man so close to you, that man being hopkins. wilkie didn't like hopkins and roosevelt said you know, you may be in this office some day and you'll understand. but he asks for nothing except to serve me. >>> now to the university of alabama law school in tuscaloosa for a discussion of labor and employment law. civil rights leaders and retired federal judge u.w. clemon spoke to students about the history of title seven of the civil rights act. this is about an hour. >> on behalf of the society and the american constitutional society, we'd like to welcome you all today to a remarkable speaker, the honorable u.w. clemon. the former chief judge of the united states district court for the northern district of alabama. long before his notable career on the federal bench, justice u.w. clemon distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, lawyer and alabama state senator. as a student educated in the segregated public schools of jefferson county, h
know, you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure, and they respond to incentives, and unless -- we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that is going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america, we should be ashamed a nation this strong has child poverty, and the kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to the flag, the phrase, accomplish justice for all,shoo be a demand, compelling as separation, and should be a conscious conviction to mak
that much of this is de influence of foreigners? will you stand down for elections next year? >> i want us to remember why we went to afghanistan. we went into afghanistan because thousand americans were viciously murdered by a terrorist organization that was operating openly and at the invitation of those who were then ruling afghanistan. it was absolutely the right thing for us to go after that organization, to go after the host government that had aided and abetted or at least allowed for these attacks to take place, and because of the core with worked of our men and women in uniform and because of the corporation and the sacrifices of afghans who had also been brutalized by the then host government, we achieved our central goal, which is -- or have come very close to achieving the central goal -- which is to decapaticate al qaeda. everything we have done over the last 10 years, from the perspective of the u.s. national security interests have been focused on that came. and at the end of this conflict, we are going to be able to say that the sacrifices that were made by those men and wo
in the next election, in fact, we lost the house for multiple reasons. but that was one of them. and -- but they came back in this period between election and now in the lame duck period and said they would do it again. it was so important to our country. >> we'll see. the fact of the matter is, where this goes, what is the political will as far as the white house is concerned, they can make a pragmatic argument that if they go with a smaller package it actually has a chance of passing if it has consensus but it could disappoint a lot of folks that want to see the white house go bigger and bolder on this issue. >>> afghan president hamid karzai is in town. he's going to be discussing the u.s. role in afghanistan post-2014. the u.s. or at least the white house is signaling it wants out of afghanistan and the white house disclosing a zero option. that is withdrawal or bust as a negotiating tactic. that's what this is. while troop levels aren't formally on the menu, the scope and size of the post-2014 force will be the focus of this trip by karzai and includes he's got meetings at
to imagine they're now going to come back and actually do something. >> if only there were a senator elected to washington -- >> who cared about the consumer. >> -- that steve rattner supported. >> i think i know where we're going. >> if only there were that person. you could just check them off. >> you know what? there is. >> steve didn't support him. >> absolutely. you are going to come around on elizabeth warren. you just are. who doesn't? elizabeth warren said this on the issue. aig's reckless bets nearly crashed our entire economy. taxpayers across this country saved aig from ruin. and it would be outrageous for this company to turn around and sue the federal government because they think the deal wasn't generous enough. steve. >> so i agree with elizabeth warren who's completely right. >> that's all i need to hear. you just made my morning. >> january 9th of the new session. >> check right there. >> it's amazing what a victory does. >> come on. >> something about 1,000 fathers and orphans. >> something like that. something like that. so i'm curious, mika. i'm reading "the new york time
. here he began promoting himself as a presidential candidate, looking to the election in 1940. the president did encourage him and he leased a farm in iowa a coors, but his hopes were dashed when hundreds of newspapers began reporting the story of a comments he allegedly made to a friend at the racetrack, which did not put the administration and the good life. the comment attributed to him was we shall tax and tax, spend and spend and elect any left. whether true or not, of course he denied it come is stuck with him the rest of his slaves and became a rallying cry for those who heeded this about in new deal. and if that wasn't enough, if cameron 1839, when moore broke in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic and the doctors had ruled out a recurrence of cancer, but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to solar nature since. said they came up with a dog's breakfast of intravenous feeding, the transfusions, injections of liver extract, a combination which he had mr. t. had off and on for the rest of his life and sometimes it works and sometimes it didn't. but
, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed and all of our cities are at full gain. i know women is have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historic. i know it is difficult. can you imagine what this soc
. [applause] to the elected and legislative to have been introducede before -- [applause] attorney general eric schneiderman, thank you for being here. senators, pleasure to be with you. i want to thank them for their leadership. the legislative accomplishments to really turn this state around. they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you. [applause] the capital looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. it was accelerated. it was extended. the building has been refurbished. it's skylights are open. it is in better shape than it has been in many, many years. [applause] i remember the first time i walked into the capital, when i was a young fellow, how i was awed and overwhelmed by the beauty and majesty of the building. somewhere along the way, it lost that luster. both physically and symbolically. we had a great team that worked tireless
've got to say, if you look at how the republican party reacted the first time president obama was elected, i wrote a book that basically could be boiled down to don't lose your -- al roker at the white house. >> exactly. >> they didn't listen. they went out, they engaged in birtherism, they called the president a racist who hated all white people, and they went so far right and so extreme that they lost middle america. and so yeah, we lost another presidential election. look at the cover of "drudge" which i think magnificently reflects the feelings of conservatives, where the conservative movement is. and you know, he links stories that people want to see, and he does it better than anybody else. this weekend, i went on "drudge." and at the top of it is a story of survivalists. that are buying property, arming themselves and building walls out west. you have sean hannity who is talking about secession. you have another talk radio host whose name isn't even worth mentioning that is talking basically about -- about how the federal government is coming in and taking weapons, you know. there'
gratitude. let's give him another round of applause. [applause] to the elected and legislative leaders who have been introduced once before, it's a pleasure to be with you. attorney general, thank you for being here. co-leaders senators, pleasure to be with you, assembly speaker, snot minority leader -- senate minority leader. assembly minority leader, i want to thank them for their leadership because last year and the year before were extraordinary years for this state. and the legislative accomplishments really turned this state around and they were difficult and challenging because it went to the real heart of the issues. but they did it. at this time i would ask the assembly and senate to stand so you can be recognized for your great work. stand please. [applause] members of the court, welcome to all of you, we thank you. [applause] >> as you heard earlier and i hope as you can tell the capitol looks a little bit different than it did over the past few years. the renovation has been complete. the renovation was accelerated and extended. it's complete. the building has been refurbished,
rockefeller announced he will not seek reelection when his term ends in 2014. he is first elected to the senate in 1984. he served as the governor of west virginia from 1977 until 1985. this is about 20 minutes. >> thank you, sharon. so incredibly much. a perfect life, by far the most popular rockefeller and west virginia. -- wife, by far, the most popular rockefeller in west virginia. i will get right to them. i have decided not to run again at the conclusion of this term. not now, but in 2014. i hope each of you can understand that this is an entirely personal decision. it is not a political decision and it is not easy. it is simply this. as i approached 50 years of nonstop public service, precluding time with the children and sharon. i consider the ways for travel in life. there are many other ways, and i know deep within me that in 2014, it is the right time for me to recalibrate and find a new balance. i came as an untrained social worker back in 1964. i actually begun my public service for years before that, working for the peace corps and the department of state. frankly, i
, looking to the election in 1940. the president gave encouraging and at least a farm in iowa, of course. but his hopes were dashed in hundreds of newspapers began reporting the story about a comment that he allegedly made to a friend at the racetrack, which did not put the administration in a good light, a comment attributed to him was, we shall tax and tax, spend and spend. whether true or not of course he denied it. it stuck with him for the rest of his life, and it became a rallying cry for those who hated the roosevelt and the new deal. and if that wasn't enough, in september 1939 when the war broke out in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic. and the doctors had ruled out recovering cancer but they couldn't figure out why he was unable to absorb nutrients. so they came up with intravenous feedings, blood transfusions, injection of liver extract, a combination which he had administered to him off and on for the rest of his life. and sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. but for the rest of his life, he was unable to gain weight. his digestive system, i'll leave
fundamental reforms are possible but the president made this a defining issue in the election. to passe was going preserver medicare -- it was unrealistic to expect this would be front and center during the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> the president says he does not favor changing medicare but on the other hand, he says he favors increasing use of managed care. does that go to the same place from a different direction? >> as you know, i have a certain track record with premium support which is actually a label that can of an article that henry aaron and i wrote in 1995. it was a very different approach, not moderately different, from what congressman ryan has pursued. i have a lot of sympathy for moving in that direction. in a sensible kind of way and we already have the medicare advantage component of medicare. we are about -- about 1/4 of beneficiaries to to get their benefits through a plan offered by some private entity that agrees to take a risk-adjusted payment to cover medicare desk type benefits for people who enroll in its. . motta fighting that program gradually over a decade
are stepping forward, and you don't have a politic that's even functional enough for actual elected conservatives. >> i am still a believer in a functi fucking two-party system, and it's hard to believe that the republican party is going to march under the especially whenever chris christie comes out, there's a sort of round of applause that he is saying. i can't imagine that they think this is a tenable position, and this leaves the ground work for a position on immigration that's in any way moderate, and how do they go through the next two years? >> the question is whether as governor ed rendell said, you may have 60% in fare of the law, but if only 10% of people who really, really care intensely about it, will make it a single issue, are the opponents? you know, it's not going to go anywhere, and that has been the situation with gun rights is that the only people who care enough to make it a single issue are the gun owners. i'm not sure that's still true, and that will be the thing. >> intensity is critically important, but the other piece of this is money and politics. the fact
, long ways to go. wasunited states of america 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the port -- of the puzzle is to elect pro- choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with our approach was anyway. -- our pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how many times did you need to out -- be asked before you ran? the women had to be asked seven times before they would say yes. and of the men cannot they did not reall
congratulations to the newly elected leadership of the democratic and republican caucuses in each chamber, and especially to speaker sharkey and majority leader aresimowicz as they take on their new roles. congratulations as well to the new members of the general assembly who were sworn in earlier today. i look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead. as we gather in this historic chamber, let us always keep in our thoughts the brave men and women of the great state of connecticut serving in our armed forces around the globe. we thank them and our veterans for their service and sacrifice, and we pray for their continued safety. i'd like to recognize my wonderful wife cathy and my sons daniel and sam who join us today. as i know is true for so many of you, i could not do my job without the tremendous love and support of my family. finally, we are joined by two of newtown's finest leaders -- first selectwoman pat llodra and school superintendent dr. janet robinson. it's an honor to have you with us today. [applause] tested by unimaginable tragedy, your compassion and leade
in future elections to the hall of fame. >>> let's take a quick look at the big board here. we have the dow before the "closing bell" in a matter of seconds. up 61 points. right at 13,390 for the day. you can always follow me on @brookeb. got to be with you. now to wolf blitzer in washington. wolf? >>> brooks, thanks very much. happening now -- >> when we hit the dock, everybody went flying. >> all of a sudden we just hit. boom. and people were catapulted forward. >> the search for answers as to why a packed ferry boat didn't stop in time, crashing into a dock and injuring dozens of new york city commuters. >>> also, vice president joe biden hears from the victims of gun violence. still to come, the nation's biggest gun seller and the nra. >>> plus, from my visit to egypt, the writing on the wall, the graphite in tahrir square tells the story of a revolution that many fear is going wrong. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin right here in washington with important news. the vice president joe biden met with victims of gun violence and gun safety advocates. they spent s
in the 2012 laerksz the republican party is now searching for a way to recover and beyond the election loss, there's house speaker john boehner, he's had his own problems lose ageffort to get support from his colleagues for a last ditch fiscal cliff measure. another story the tea party wing in the gop still has influence. and that sometimes causes major divisions. so is it time for the party to change? does it need to become a big tent? rich galen joins us from washington, a republican strategist. rich, i guess you could say the gop has its own bad case of the flu. what's the cure here? >> part of it is is just as with the flu for most people, wait it out. take plenty of water, go to bed and wait till you feel better. that's part of what's going to have to happen here. these things in washington tend to be cyclical. in terms of what the republicans in the house are going through, it's useful to remember, when i first came back to washington in 1996, i talked to a friend. i was working for newt gingrich. i was talking to a friend who worked for tip o'neill. i said how did tip spend his day?
the american people and october on himself. he feel he is has a mandate, he was re-elected and there is no accountability. davis how effective can executive order be if most gun law is state and local based how effective is executive order overturned by the next president? >> bob: good point. every president used executive orders for their political philosophy when they don't think they get it through congress. they are not against people who own guns. third, give a break here to see what biden says there. may be more to this than just a assault weapons been a. maybe there is a more comprehensive view. give him that much time -- >> dana: we are. >> bob: you talk about the hypocrisy. >> kimberly: i was asking specific question about the gun prosecution. it answered it as well. thank you very much. >> greg: i agree with bob. they have to address the mental health issue or it's pointless. meet with the entertainment industry, if you could put a film maker in jail over instigating a riot thousands of miles away should you imprison filmmakers and video game makers in hollywood f
on this, but it's fascinating to look at this in the broader context of the 2014 elections, and even after 2016, where i think what the liberal groups hope to do right now is consolidate their victories in 2012 and expand on them over the next four years. >> megyn: to what extent can they accomplish these goals? because these are not moneyless, powerless groups? these are heavy hitters and now going to work together and they say it's up to 30 to 35 groups that are going to work together to accomplish these goals. >> we've seen that the president has been responsive to pushes from his left in his first term. if you look, for instance, at what happened with the keystone pipeline, there were basically threats by the environmental groups that they were not going to take their access out, not going door-to-door for the president if in tactful fact backed the keystone pipeline. i'm not sure you can drawing a correlation between those two, but there's no question that that agitation had an influence on the white house and with the president and we've seen that with other groups and i think that's
a lot of money on the elections last cycle. they didn't have a lot to show for it especially if you look at results. a lot of their candidates lost. we are looking at return on their investment they had a low return on investment. they are very strong lobby. think the issue is who is going to remember the voices of the american people in this debate. >> reporter: president obama has said he wants to lay it on some of the proposals his task force gives him in the state of the union address. that task force led by the vice president is going to give president obama their recommendations on tuesday in the state of the union is scheduled for february 12th, one month from yesterday. >> gregg: peter, thanks very much. >> fox news is taking a closer look at the gun control debate with a special hannity airing tonight featuring a studio audience compromised some of the new yorkers who were outed by the journal news for having gun permits. that is at 9:00 p.m. eastern time right here on fox news channel. >> arthel: growing concerns over the shortages of flu vaccines as sick americans are overcrow
in 2003 investigating the issue. now, it is possible that no one will get elected into the hall of fame and if that happens, it would only be the second time in more than four dick aid. it might even create a logjam in next year's elections. coming up we'll tell you why this shouldn't fall squarery on baseball players themselves. tara moriarty, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you. >>> 7:06. sal is back now. boy, the commute is getting heavier and heavier. >> it certainly is, dave, and tori. this is the time when you start seeing the peak of this commute. you will see slow traffic all over the place. let's start off with a look at the toll plaza and the east shore, the east shore leading to the toll plaza, if will be pretty slow especially as you get past el cerrito. it slows down on the way to berkeley. it's not as bad as it could be. there is a little bit of space there in some of those lanes which is a nice surprise. maybe later in the week or maybe later in this morning is what i meant to say, it might get better after 8:00. moving along to the slow traffic on the east bay commute, all
much the president feels empowered by his second election, you know, the inauguration a couple of days away and what his read is on where the country is on this issue. we heard from gabrielle giffords and mark kelly the other day, they say they are gun owners but want to see restrictions on assault weapons and multiple clips. what is your sense for which way this is going? when. >> reporter: you know, at the beginning, soon after newtown and at the beginning of this back and forth it seemed like that could have a lot of votes in congress to move through. it seems as often has happened that sides, they go to their corners. we'll see after the vice president comes out with the tax force recommendations whether there is some coming together on some solutions. what hasn't been talked about a lot are the mental health aspects of this. or the hollywood aspect of it, and we haven't focused on it. so if there is a comprehensive approach to it, perhaps it will get more people involved. martha: as you said coming into this there are so many laws already on the books that are just not enforced, m
, it puts a real check and balance. even china which is serving not an elected country, sensitive to public criticism. if you look at the train accident, w.h.o., which is there vision -- version of twitter, ultimately this fellow was seen as a seen as god is now on his way to prison because of corruption. think about the terrible things that go on in the world, the people who were at the whim of the police chief or minority's or the terrible status women are treated in much of the developing world. we will have games. you can out anonymously report them. you can imagine a network were a bad thing is occurring, you reported unanimously. you can build those kinds of networks and data and develop an epic fact that everybody is connected has large numbers of step folks. let's talk about health care. we were talking earlier in the video about 2050 about health care. people sort of snickered when the gentlemen mentioned to us, the fda just approved the first bill that you can swallow that has a digital chip in it that wi-fi is out what is going on in your stomach. to all of us basically would lik
saw -- i know he saw the steven spielberg movie "lincoln" which president lincoln says, i am the re-elected president clothed in immense power. >> the president doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected a third time. he can do a lot. >> there's another scene that is not a movie. it's the scene of harry truman sitting at his desk just before he left and losing and say, poor ike, do this, do that, and nothing will happen. presidents have the power to persuade. the president may be feeling very inflated right now. obviously he is. but the grind of politics and congress is the stronger branch. >>> let's talk about the vice president of the united states. he spoke out on his task force to deal with the issue of guns. listen to what he said today. >> the president is going to act. executive orders, executive action can be taken. we haven't decided what that is yet but we're compiling it all with the help of the attorney general and all the rest of the cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is required. >> now, executive orders, the president just signs it. it's done. he doe
out of iraq and came on the joint staff the summer of 2008, it was getting worse. we had elections coming in the united states and then they had elections in afghanistan. my predecessor in afghanistan general mckernen asked for some troops in 2008. it was decided not to act on that request on the last months of president bush's administration and there was some ongoing assessments. when president obama assumed office with his team in january of 2009, in fact that request was tabled in front of him. and now we have a new administration who has been in the campaign rhetoric supportive of the war in afghanistan. they're faced with a larger quest for troops, faster than they might have liked to be comfortable and time to die just that. they're also hit with a financial crises when it first took over. and so the first response i think is to say well give us time to assess this. but instead, the military department of defense appropriately says we've got afghan elections approaching in the summer and if these forces are going to van impact to help widen security, they have to be approved
. there is an ecuadorean national election in february next year. it seems to be that there is a bit of a diplomatic waiting game as far as the u.s. and u.k. are concerned, to look to see how that election goes. presidents correa is the most popular political leader in south america, so it should be fine, but there have been reports that the united states has increased its anti-correa funding by three times. so that is a potential problem. the people of ecuador have been very supportive. i suspect, even if there is a switch to another leader, it is now a matter of national pride. they will stick with the cause. >> and as to how you feel people should use the internet today and protect themselves, as we wrap up with your book "cypherpunks." >> first, it is not always possible to protect oneself. if you walk over the edge of the cliff, it is not really possible to protect yourself. it is important know that the cliff is there so that you can simply avoid doing something that would put you at risk. first thing they should do is go out and buy the book. it is not easy to protect yourself. that is part o
. newly elected senator elizabeth warren called the idea of suing the government outrageous, saying aig was, quote, biting the hand that fed them. public relations blunder came at a particularly bad time for the company which was looking to remake its image with a series of ads titled "thank you america." >> the leading global insurance company based right here in america. >> we've repaid every dollar america lent to us. >> everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. >> for the american people. >> thank you, america. >> helping people recover and rebuild. that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. >> so they just rolled out those ads a week ago and then came out and threatened to sue the government. >> and on twitter, what we were asking yesterday, what would elizabeth warren do, is now becoming a, i don't know -- >> a hash tag? >> yes. exactly. >> that's huge. >> what's the "i" for in aig, ingrate? >> they are not joining the lawsuit. editorial page of "the wall street journal" suggests that aig probably did the right thing by not joining the lawsuit, but it doesn't mean t
to loosen on immigration, that all of a sudden you're going to lose elections. i see that as the ticket to winning elections today. >> mike, the followed the power of the gun lobby for a long time. can somebody do that? can a republican do that? >> i think a republican can do almost anything on universal background checks. universal background checks is the key. that's the first step. get that in there. almost -- you'd almost want to say, the vice president's task force would almost want to say, okay, next thursday in the house, we're going to have a vote on universal background checks. that's the steppingstone to get us to some sensible position. how can anyone, with any common sense, no matter where you are in the ideological spectrum, be against universal background checks? >> and by the way, i've seen some polls, like 85% of americans want universal background checks. >> yeah. >> by a republican pollster. 85% want universal background checks which would go a long way in getting rid of some of the insanity that we see at gun shows and online where there are no background checks. >> i
fire he was elected a delegate under william c. cox. a volunteer fire company he helped organize a year earlier. february 1863, he replaced the foreman. sawyer and every byway in san francisco, every steep hill, and twisting road. had to stall, wants a strong bloodthirsty vigilante had lived with his family on the top floor of the montgomery block. since the building was erected over a decade earlier. before that you have the baths across the way. he was living here when james king, the self-righteous muckraking editor of the daily evening bulletin was gunned down out front. the shooter was james casey, a former volunteer fireman with a criminal past in the tombs of new york. king brought inside to die was laid out on ed stahle's counter. his huge head, heavy from so much brain, wolf to one side as he walked. as he lay dying, his head lay over the bursting table. when king died in room 297 of the montgomery block, every born vigilance committee alleged casey and set the city of flying. ed stahle still held strong opinions. he was figures opposed wind number of his patrons, especially th
sense gun laws and the disconnect with the elected officials who aren't doing that right now. that's really how we're moving forward with this thing. >> cenk: so were specific proposals discussed and if so, what were they? >> there were a punch of specific proposals not just legislative proposal but executive decisions that can be made, as well as trying to change the culture and behavior of gun violence in america. he likened it to automobile accidents and drinking and driving over decades of regulatory policies and changing the culture of drinking and driving and wearing seat belts we have reduced accidents and deaths. he wants to bring that understanding and approach to the gun advo advocacy. background checks and limiting magazines, we've heard that, so to have that to go with it is great. >> you'll occupy that seat tomorrow i presume are going to be people from the rifle association and differing opinions to gun control than you. how do you feel about the fact that they're going to be hearing from them as well and maybe even getting the last word from them tomorrow. >> i think
solution dot org. >> the web site called on elected officials to work toward stopping gun violence in promoting responsible gun ownership. >> difference retired from congress last year to focus on recovery after she was shot and ahead on this day in 2011. >> six others died in the encounter, including a nine year-old girl and a federal judge. >> will have more on whether news and traffic when we come ♪♪ ♪ ♪ th is is iamazinaz how did diyou fiu us? u i thoughout we mig mht be blatela so i h iad a fibefir analanysis disee and ansure ereugh,ugwe 're fae ly.ly but buyou'reu'ot eotn shn ddeddd you're..re.cruncru?!?! th at hap hpens snsetimet.. and you yohelp klpp pep le flel lwithwiholehorainraiberib justju like iku guu .. [ femalema announner ]erhey'he di fferenert, but bhe shee.e. new frw osted temini-wniats atunchun a tasty stsquareuaackeac wi th a c arunch.nc [ cr[ unch! ch ...o..f wholwhgraigrfibefi thatth helpseleep eeyofuu .. it 's a b aig bre bfastfa.. [ cr[ unch! ch ...i..n new nelittli bis bit.it smilsme! ohhh bhhring ingin!in ooohhhohooh!h!
on the water last summer. he does not plan to soak re- elect. >>> metro riders want to know when it will be ready in silver spring. the transit center was initially supposed to be finished 15 years ago. then there was a series of problems, including unsafe concrete. >> we would like the county to have a public hearing and to announce a public hearing to tell us the details of the report, answer questions that we have. we may not be thrilld with answers but we would like ton what is going on. >> and apparently at first there was no public hearing. the group has been told that the county doesn't plan to sue. >>> we're following a developing story in new york city tonight. dozens of people are in the hospital after a commuter ferry slammed into a pier and it happened during rush hour. more than 50 people hurt, at least two critical and 9 listed in serious condition. the ntsb is investigating the accident and for more on this accident, fox's linda schmidt joins us live from the city. commuters are being tossed around like rag dolls into the air and against walls and windows. what are
that president car are sooi stole the last election. just have a listen. >> correctly seen as illegitimate as many afghans and by people around the world. he runs a corrupt regime. his vice president according to these documents had $53 million in cash going to dubai. there is no legitimate explanation for the vice president of a country running off with $53 million. another of these documents appointments out that his half brother is involved in the drug trade. and then there are of course the accounts of karzai himself as being emotional, unstable, suggestions that he uses drugs. >> a lot of allegations there, but i think to the point is whether president karzai can be trusted in a way to run his own country or is he the only game in town, and regardless of troop numbers, there will be billions of dollars needed to run the army that is now being built up by the u.s. and nato. >> that's right. at the nato conference, they pledged to at least ten years of providing beginning $4.1 billion a year, $2.5 billion of that coming from the u.s. but i think it's important for us to recognize as we
who come out in midterm elections because midterm elections, unlike presidential elections, you tend to get people from the far right and the far left who come out and vote. and so these democrats have to decide whether those gun owners would be with them on a certain number of issues so they could still get re-elected and still do some kind of gun control, wolf. >> and remember the price they paid for this during the clinton administration. >> right. they do want to do gun control but they have to find out what is realistic and what's not and that assault weapons ban is right there smack in the middle of everything. >> thanks very much, gloria. >>> more than half a million people are fleeing syria's civil war and now winter is compounding the misery for many refugees. >>> plus, details from this spectacular winter phenomena. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t
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